Is There Job Flexibility as a Registered Nurse?

Is There Job Flexibility as a Registered Nurse?

Some people choose the job of being a nurse because it provides an opportunity to make a difference in the lives of patients and their families. Others do it for job security, great pay, and benefits. But the most surprising perk of working as a registered nurse is actually the flexibility of the role. Other careers just can’t compare. In this blog, we’ll discuss how being an RN can be flexible, what options you have to achieve job flexibility, and also where you can go from here if you decide your current role isn’t the right fit.

What are the Jobs with the Most Flexibility in the Nursing Field?

Finding better work/life balance in the nursing field isn’t as hard as you might imagine. Why? Because, first, you can select from a wide range of nursing environments, including:

  • Hospitals
  • Small group practices
  • Schools
  • Prisons
  • Rehab centers
  • Ambulatory surgery centers
  • Home Health
  • Mental health rehabilitation centers
  • Colleges and universities
  • Nursing homes
  • The military
  • And more

There are even completely virtual nursing jobs. NursingCE talks about them in a recent blog:

  • Virtual healthcare recruiters sometimes use nurses as part of their technical screening processes.
  • Telemedicine nurses work strictly in the virtual space, conducting patient evaluations, triage, diagnosing, and treating patients.
  • Insurance nurses use work-from-home talent to screen, evaluate, and coach surgery patients or those with chronic illnesses.
  • A Health Coach is a nurse entrepreneur of sorts; you can seek out specialized certifications and then build a book of contract business, or work full-time.
  • Freelance nurse writers produce content for medical journals, blogs, and more.

Even if these roles don’t appeal to you, the traditional nursing profession isn’t a 9-to-5 job anymore. Today, you can work as a:

  • Per diem nurses, are contract nurses that fill temporary staffing gaps. You’ll find per diems in almost any facility but particularly in hospitals during inpatient population spikes or just to fill in for someone on vacation. Per diem work is very flexible because you can choose to take or not take the job. Many times, these flexible roles come with benefits through the staffing agency that employs you.
  • PRN nurses are on-call until they’re needed. These floating nurses are a bit like substitute teachers in that they fill in an unexpected gap in staffing.
  • Travel nurses can pick up contract staffing roles around the country. These nurses make excellent money—some of the best rates in the industry—and most pay for lodging and more.
  • Job-sharing nurses can split a full-time position along with benefits. This gives you the flexibility of a part-time job but with full-time perks.

In the past, the idea of nursing didn’t bring the vision of job flexibility and work/life balance. But today, the field has changed. Not only do you have job options and educational choices, but you can also pick the job based on its flexibility to fit your lifestyle.

 

If you’re ready for a more flexible lifestyle and a better work environment, call on AG Globe Services. We work with the leading healthcare companies in the U.S to provide them with the best RNs in the business.

1165584_AGGlobeServicesCTABannersKICKOFF_B2_082621

Career Spotlight: Registered Nurse

Career Spotlight: Registered Nurse

You’ve seen them on T.V. and encountered these clinical angels in real-life. Registered nurses (RNs) are the backbone of the healthcare profession. They perform their life-saving duties in clinical settings across the U.S. As a career profession, having an R.N. designation means you will have your pick of jobs in the coming years. The latest data shows the U.S. will need 13 million nurses to join the profession in the next decade to keep up with demand. 

In this blog, we’re shining a career spotlight on R.N.s. We’ll discuss the basics of the job, what education path most people take, and the personal qualities that make a good R.N. We’ll also touch on the different specialties you can go into once you become an R.N. If you’re ready to explore a career as an R.N., browse our open roles today! 

Understanding the R.N. Role

R.N.s provide necessary care and caring to patients within the medical field. These professionals do it all: From communicating care instructions to patients to providing it. Nurses can: 

  • Administer treatments to patients. 
  • Assist doctors in treating patients. 
  • Coordinate specialty care teams. 
  • Perform diagnostic testing. 
  • Operate medical equipment. 
  • Comfort patients and families 
  • Follow up on patient care. 
  • And more!

An R.N. can work in a variety of settings. There are R.N.s in schools and prisons as well as nursing homes and hospitals. You’ll see a nurse in an E.R. and nurses even participate in surgical procedures. Some of the settings you’ll encounter as an R.N. include: 

  • Private and public hospitals where you will typically work as part of a specialized unit, such as intensive care (ICU) or the emergency department (E.R.).  
  • Ambulatory health clinics are often specialized around care delivery. For example, there are freestanding surgical hospitals devoted to orthopedics and clinics that provide dialysis treatment—to name just two of the many options out there. 
  • Residential care and nursing facilities typically provide long-term care to the elderly and infirm. There are also facilities that offer rehabilitative treatment for patients trying to recover from surgery or a traumatic accident. 
  • Private medical practices are often the first point of care for patients. Many build long-term relationships with their patients, and you’ll find nurses working hard to build your trust and treat your illnesses. 

 

While the settings for nursing vary, so too do the specialty areas you can pursue as an R.N. For example, you could pursue an Associates Degree (ADN) in nursing or a Bachelor’s (BSN), however many nurses stay in school or go back to receive a Master’s Degree (MSN). The MSN prepares you to take on supervisory and administrative positions within a healthcare setting.  

Then there are the medical specialty areas to pursue. You could become a gerontology nurse and work with the elderly. On the opposite side of the spectrum, you could become a neonatal or a pediatric nurse. There are jobs and rewarding work for all of these professions—and more. 

If you have a desire to heal and help people and are ready to change your career path, perhaps nursing is the right profession to consider. A.G. Globe is standing by to help you find your dream R.N. job. If you’re thinking about a career move, check out our job listings and get in touch with our team. 

1165584_AGGlobeServicesCTABannersKICKOFF_B2_082621

Additional Certifications to Boost your Healthcare Resume

Additional Certifications to Boost your Healthcare Resume

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) calls certifications “A fast track to careers.” It’s true that certifications can be an alternative way to earn the credentials you need to start a career. In healthcare, these certifications can also boost your existing experiences and credentials to fast-track you to a better job. 

If you’re looking for ways to boost your resume while working in the healthcare field, you’ve come to the right place. In this blog, we will break down additional certifications you can earn to help you level up your career. If you’re looking for your next role in healthcare, get in touch with the AG Globe Services team today!  

Top Resume Boosting Certifications in Healthcare

Healthcare certifications matter to employers. They show that you have the skills employers can rely upon. For healthcare workers who have been in the field for a time, they also show that you’ve made an effort to keep their skills up-to-date. Most credentialed professionals in healthcare are required by law to update their certifications periodically. If you’re looking to break into the healthcare field or modernize your existing skills, here are some certifications that matter to employers:
 

  • CCS-P, Certified Coding Specialist Physician-Based
    Coding, of course, is how physicians get reimbursed for their work. That makes the CCS-P designation particularly important if you’re trying to get a job in a physician’s practice or even an extensive healthcare system. This certification teaches you how to assign codes to particular treatments that doctors and midlevel practitioners perform.  
  • CPCT, Certified Patient Care Technician
    The National Healthcareer Association (NHA) offers this certification, and these credentialed employees will be incredibly sought after in the coming years. CPCTs work closely with patients to provide the necessary care. This could include everything from bathing and feeding to administering doctor-prescribed medications. As the baby boomer population continues to age, having a CPCT under your belt means you will find meaningful work in the future. 
  • CET, Certified EKG Technician
    EKG techs monitor heart rhythms via an electrocardiogram machine. With this certification, you’ll learn how to explain this vital heart monitoring procedure to patients, how to check blood pressure, place the EKG monitor leads on the patient’s body, and more. This is a quick certification that can add real value to your healthcare resume. 
  • CPT, Certified Phlebotomy Technician
    Blood testing is the gold standard during diagnostic medical exams. A CPT is responsible for collecting these samples from a patient. CPTs also work in blood donation centers, collecting from donors for people in need. It’s a very important job that can be challenging to learn, so a CPT designation on your resume is highly valuable whether you are a nurse or a patient aide—or just a CPT. This certification teaches you safe and efficient blood collection procedures. As part of the credentialing process, you will practice drawing blood from patients.  

 

While these are a few of the most important certifications that you can earn in healthcare, there are more available in this highly complex and exciting field. 

If you’re thinking about a career move, check out our jobs listings and get in touch—AG Globe Services is here to help.

Browse jobs

Questions to Bring into your Next Healthcare Interview

Questions to Bring into your Next Healthcare Interview

So, you have an interview coming up for a new role in healthcare? Congrats! Even as the interviewee, you should still come prepared with a couple of questions for your interviewer. By asking engaging questions, you’ll be able to learn more about the company and position while also standing out from the crowd.

Here are some of the best questions to bring to your next healthcare interview that will help you understand exactly what you’re walking into if you end up in that job.

Best Questions to Ask your Healthcare Interviewer


Whether you’re a clinician or work on the backend of healthcare, you should come prepared with interview questions. Most hiring teams expect this of you and many will judge you as less-than interested if you don’t bring a handful of questions to every interview. You should be emboldened by the fact that, in today’s hot job market, the candidate is interviewing the company as much as they are the other way around. This is especially true in healthcare, where labor shortages have fueled the urgency of recruiting teams to fill roles at every level of the service delivery paradigm.

During these interviews, inevitably the hiring manager will turn to you and ask, “Now, what questions do you have for me?” What you ask at this point can literally make or break your decision to take the job and possibly tip the hiring scales in favor of the employer making you an offer. What are the best questions to ask your interviewer at this point?

Tell me about the team I’ll be working with?

Even the largest hospitals operate in smaller units within the facility. Sometimes your fit within this micro-culture is more important to the job description itself. Try to find out more about the people you’ll be working elbow-to-elbow with. How long have they been in the organization? Who do you report to? How would the interviewer describe the daily interactions of these individuals?

What would the ideal candidate look like for this role and how do I compare?

In this case, how the interviewer answers the question is almost as important as the answer they give. You’re looking for an organization that is fairly transparent, candid, but also professional. Too, if you know what skills the organization values, you can get a better sense of culture feel before you ever step foot in the door.

What is your favorite part of working here?

This question is a good way to build camaraderie with an employer. After all, who doesn’t like to talk about themselves? The longevity of the interviewer in the organization and what makes them stay on the team can help determine whether it’s a place that you would also want to call home.

What are the next steps in the hiring process?

This question should be a no-brainer for any candidate. It shows your engagement. It’s the sign of an organized mind. It also can unveil organizations who are less than organized. While many healthcare organizations have lengthy hiring processes, this question will help you spot any disorganization in the team.

 

AG Globe works closely with candidates just like you to find the best healthcare organizations to make good use of your skills. We have a wide range of openings. Start your search for a new role today!

Browse jobs

3 Reasons to Consider a Contract Healthcare Assignment this Summer

3 Reasons to Consider a Contract Healthcare Assignment this Summer

We’ve never seen a healthcare job market like this. The demand for clinical and even administrative candidates has been outrageously high. Even with a low unemployment rate this year, we still will fall far short of filling the jobs that are currently open. There’s never been a better time to work in the healthcare field.

But what about healthcare contracting? One of the most notable developments over the past few years has been the rise of more contracting positions; from per diem and locum tenens to travel nursing, there is a new level of flexibility in the kinds of jobs you’ll find in healthcare today. Contract jobs have some unique benefits. What are they? Why would you consider a contract healthcare role this summer? We have answers that will help inform your decision-making this year.

Benefits of Considering a Healthcare Contract

If you’re on the job hunt and have healthcare skills right now, it’s time to stop and consider your options. Joining a full-time role this summer may interfere with your vacation plans. But have you considered contracting your skills? Healthcare organizations are desperately looking for talent during the months when their workforce is desperately seeking time off—and they’re paying top dollar and signing bonuses for your expertise and willingness to help. Why would you consider taking on a temporary position when there are so many open full-time roles this summer?

  • First, contract roles are incredibly flexible. You can take on short-term assignments that allow you to get the time off you need this summer with your family. That schedule flexibility is incredibly valuable and a huge perk of contracting. For example, in addition to scheduling your contract job around an already-scheduled family vacation, maybe you want a job in a cooler climate to get out of the summer heat this year. There are all kinds of perks and bonuses found in the general flexibility that a healthcare contract brings.
  • We mentioned compensation, but it’s so lucrative now to contract that it’s worth mentioning again. Some specialty areas in healthcare make even more money; for example, traveling nurses have fantastic salaries, signing bonuses, and the employer will put you up somewhere and pay for your travel. Generally, if you have certain specialties, you stand a better shot of making a very high income as a healthcare contractor.
  • You’ll also be able to try out a brand-new healthcare environment. New working environments are risky if you’re going in full-time. A contract job this summer gives you the opportunity to try out a workplace before committing to a full-time role. It may even allow you to try out different teams within a larger employer to see where you might fit. Because there are so many jobs right now, you should have no problems targeting a specific employer to come back to in a full-time position.

 

Today’s healthcare job market is much different than in the past. There are dozens of lucrative contract roles that offer you flexibility during the summer months or even beyond that time. Our team works hard to pin down these roles and then make sure you find the one that fits your goals. If you’re ready for your next summer contract assignment, get in touch with the AG Globe team today!

Browse jobs

 

Career Spotlight: Certified Nursing Assistants

Career Spotlight: Certified Nursing Assistants

Certified nursing assistants (CNAs), also known as nursing aides, are in-demand. That’s because healthcare doesn’t happen without a CNA somewhere in the mix. CNAs provide direct care to patients, whether they are in their homes, in a skilled nursing facility, or in other in-patient settings. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts these jobs will grow at a rate of 8% annually through 2030. As the baby boomer population continues to age and needs skilled nursing care, CNAs will play an important role in meeting these needs. In this blog, we’ll share important information on the CNA/nursing aid role. What education do you need to become a CNA? What skills will you need to take on this work? We have answers that can help you decide if a CNA position is right for you.

What is a CNA?

Certified nursing assistants take care of patients directly under the supervision of a professional nursing team. This is an entry-level role perfect for anyone seeking to break into steady work in the healthcare industry. On a typical day, a CNA will:

  • Help multiple patients with a variety of health concerns.
  • Aid patients with mobility issues with basic life skills such as eating, bathing, dressing, and even movement and exercise.
  • Monitor and record the patient’s food and beverage intake.
  • Update the nursing team on any changes in the condition of the patient.

In a hospital, the CNA may do all of these things, but also, they may:

  • Deliver patient meals.
  • Answer phones at the nursing stations or assist patients in making calls.
  • Clean patient rooms by wiping down surfaces, sweeping, and taking out the trash.
  • Provide emotional support to patients who are feeling sad or discouraged by simply listening to them.
  • Helping push equipment from one room to another or even transporting a patient to a testing location.

What Skills Will You Need To Be a CNA?

A CNA job is physical. You’ll be on your feet and moving around. You may be required to lift or move patients. During this you will also need to exhibit caring and compassion for the patient. You’ll need to notice small patient details and report on them in the charting. Communication is critical in these positions. You will also need:

  • Patience, optimism, and a sense of humor will help with stress.
  • Some knowledge of medical phrases and terminology
  • Flexibility; each day will be as different as the patients you serve.

Interestingly, you can jump right into these positions. There are some great programs out there that are low cost (but high return). Completing one will set you up to break right into healthcare—fast. What kind of training and education will you need to land your first CNA job?

What Education and Training Will You Need?

CNA certifications can be obtained in as little as 90-days. This usually includes about 75 hours of classroom work plus on-the-ground training in the clinical skills you’ll need. There is a CNA examination required in the state where you’re working. You don’t need a college degree, either. That means there is a low barrier to entry for CNA positions and the certifications themselves are quite affordable. For about $1,300, you can have the certifications you need to take on this role.

 

If you’re ready to explore a career as a nursing aide, browse our open roles today!

Browse jobs